Stitch Patterns

These are stitch-patterns, not the pattern. The pattern is the step by step guide to a finished piece, and sometimes this pattern will ask you to knit x-amount of inches using a certain stitch-pattern. There are times when the pattern will ask you to knit the entire piece using a single stitch-pattern. Again, what’s the difference? The larger plan (the pattern) will include things a stitch-pattern won’t include: gauge, the number of stitches to cast on, what size needles to use, how long your piece must be, etc. Essentially, a stitch-pattern is just a part of the whole, a piece of the larger picture.

Garter Stitch

Abbreviated as G st. Garter is thick and reversible (it looks the same on the front as on the back). Garter stitch is often used to make dishcloths. I once used it to create a thick spot for the palm of a mitten I was making. You create a garter stitch pattern by knitting the following:

row 1: k to end

row 2: k to end

Repeat rows 1–2 until you reach the length you want.

garterStitch

Stockinette Stitch

Abbreviated as St st. Stockinette gives you a smooth, uniform look to your knitted project. There are two opposite sides: the front is all knit stitch and the back is all purl stitch. You achieve this pattern by knitting the following:

row 1: k to end

row 2: p to end

Repeat rows 1–2 until you reach the length you want.

stockinetteFront

stockinetteBack

Ribbing

Abbreviated as rib. Ribbing is reversible and the most elastic stitch-pattern available. Often you will see ribbing around the cuff of a sleeve or the brim of a hat. What is the cause of its flexible super powers? Simple. The pattern alternates between knit and purl stitches within a row. Complete the following steps to create some ribbing:

row 1: (k1 p1) repeat to end

row 2: (p1 k1) repeat to end

Repeat rows 1–2 until you reach the length you want.

 Note: if you want thicker ribs, increase the number of knit and purl stitches in your pattern (ex: k3 p3).

ribbing

Want More?

For a different take on this subject, check out this article from the Tin Can Knits blog.

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